“On Water” September 7 – October 2, 2021

Inspired by the end of summer and time spent near the lake, we have curated an exhibition of artworks that explore the meditative, romantic and powerful nature of water.

“On Water” includes artwork by David Alexander, Susan Dobson, Roly Fenwick, Gathie Falk, Krisjanis Kaktins-Gorsline, Doug Kirton, Michael Smith and Ed Zelenak.

 

David Alexander‘s tumbling, cascading and powerful “Falls North of Sudbury” painting was the impetus for the exhibition.  Painted after Alexander spent months travelling in Northern Ontario in the Fall of 2000, the painting is an energetic exploration of the movement of water.  As a peaceful antidote to Alexander’s canvas, we next hung Susan Dobson‘s “Viewfinder” photograph “Sanderson Tropical Field Camera” and Roly Fenwick‘s serene “Confluence”.   Both are meditative and calm and reflect long days of looking at hot summer reflections on the Great Lakes.

Though Krisjanis Kaktins-Gorsline‘s canvas “Untitled #1” does not specifically depict water, but rather a lush forest interior, the painting invokes the feeling of dappled light and glistening reflections and felt natural next to Dobson’s photograph.

Michael Smith‘s tondo “Light in Fathoms” welcomes the viewer to the exhibition.  Inspired by an underwater ‘vision’ of the bell from HMS Terror – you can almost make out the bell shape on the right-hand side of the painting.  The gestured brushstrokes summon the energy of the deep ocean and the excitement of the Franklin Expedition. 

Hanging next to each other are two dappled reflections of water: Gathie Falk‘s “Pieces of Water: Parliament Bells” and Doug Kirton‘s “Loomers”.  Falk, specifically, has painted a “chunk” or piece of water from a particular day, while Doug Kirton’s dreamlike painting is of a specific place where he has returned to many times for inspiration.

Ed Zelenak‘s “Divining Rod” sculpture perhaps perfectly represents the influence of water as subject.  The symbol of the divining rod is directly in the centre of the sculpture and emits a flow of energy.  Used as an ancient tool to locate ground water, the user, or dowser, responds to the earth’s vibrations to find the hidden water source.  Zelenak takes the forked symbol of the rod as an icon to express the cyclical connection that humans have with nature, myths and history.